Happy Birthday George Washington!

On February 22, 1732 at a plantation located in Pope’s Creek, Westmoreland County in the colony of Virginia, George Washington was born. He was the first child of Augustine Washington and Augustine’s second wife, Mary Bell Washington. Not much is known of his childhood except that his family were successful farmers and, for those times, were well off, likely well off enough to afford private education and tutoring for their children.
The young George looked up to his older brother Lawrence, the son of his father and his father’s first wife, and saw him as sort of a mentor, especially in their later years together. The brothers had been very close. Lawrence had been educated in England and, like others in his family, was a prosperous man with his own estate. George’s only trip outside of America was to Barbados, and he made the trip with Lawrence. While they were there, George suffered from smallpox and his illness left him with permanent facial scars.
When Lawrence, who was suffering from tuberculosis, died in 1752, George inherited Lawrence’s estate, Mount Vernon, in Alexandria, Virginia. George had been a surveyor before this and was saving up money to purchase his own land but after inheriting his brother’s estate, his brother’s final gift to him, he no longer had to worry about buying and building his own.
The same year Lawrence died, in 1752, the twenty-year-old George was appointed as the commander of the Virginia militia. He had no military experience prior to this. As part of the Virginia militia, he fought in the French and Indian War. His actions during the war put him in charge of every militia force in Virginia. In 1759, he resigned and returned home. At just 27 years old, he was elected into the Virginia House of Burgesses and served until 1774. That same year, in 1759, he married a wealthy widow named Martha Dandridge Custiss. They never had any children, but she had two children from her first marriage, and George was a doting stepfather to the two of them
In the 1760s, the years leading up to the American Revolution, George Washington at the time was just an average citizen, enjoying his family and household, but he became fed up with the rising taxes. He had expanded his Mount Vernon estate into an 8,000 acre property that contained five farms and he raised mules and grew a variety of crops. The taxes were starting to take a toll on him, and many other Americans, financially. He joined the countless other colonists who decided to stand up against England.
In 1774, George served in the First Continental Congress and a year later, was named the Continental Army’s commander-in-chief. After the war’s official end in 1783, George was hailed as a national hero, but, being the humble man that he was, he remained graciously modest. He returned home to Mount Vernon and resumed his life as an average farmer, but in 1787, was summoned to attend the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia to help draft a new Constitution. While he was there, the other delegates once again recognized him for his impressive leadership during the revolution, and how he had managed to influence those under his command to continue fighting and not give up. They all came to the agreement that George Washington should be the nation’s first president.
George Washington’s gentle, humble nature came back at first, but the demand of the public made him give in. On January 7th, the first presidential election was held and he won against John Adams, the other presidential nominee. John Adams became the vice-president.
He was inaugurated in New York City and was the only president to have never lived in the White House, as Washington D.C. was not yet the nation’s capitol. During his time as president, George Washington lived in both New York City and Philadelphia. He decided to set examples of what he felt a president needed to be. He kept things fair and equal as possible. He built cordial relationships with other countries and wanted to remain neutral in foreign conflicts. The public, still used to the ways of England, wanted to appoint him as a king, but the nation’s first president gently reminded them what they had fought for; not a monarchy, but a republic, a government run by the people and for the people. He refused to serve any more terms than two.
In 1796, he read a farewell address to his nation and encouraged future presidents to keep the standards he set. He then retired to Mount Vernon and lived the last three years of his life being the gentleman farmer he wanted to be before his forty years of public service.
He died at the age of 67 in 1799 from a throat infection, but his legacy lives on as The Father of our Country, and named in his honor is our nation’s capitol, among countless schools, towns, counties, and even an entire U.S. state.
In 1800, the very first unofficial “Washington’s Birthday” was celebrated on the day of his birth by a country still mourning him one a year after his death, and in 1879, it became an official commemoration day, celebrated only in Washington D.C. In 1885, the first Washington’s Birthday was declared a national holiday. In 1971, the holiday became known as President’s Day and was moved to the third Monday of February as an attempt to create more three day weekends for workers, and the holiday celebrating Washington was then shared with Abraham Lincoln. Many still recognize February 22 as being Washington’s Birthday and museums and historical societies often hold Washington-related events to honor him.

'Happy Birthday George Washington!

On February 22, 1732 at a plantation located in Pope's Creek, Westmoreland County in the colony of Virginia, George Washington was born. He was the first child of Augustine Washington and Augustine's second wife, Mary Bell Washington. Not much is known of his childhood except that his family were successful farmers and, for those times, were well off, likely well off enough to afford private education and tutoring for their children.
The young George looked up to his older brother Lawrence, the son of his father and his father's first wife, and saw him as sort of a mentor, especially in their later years together. The brothers had been very close. Lawrence had been educated in England and, like others in his family, was a prosperous man with his own estate. George's only trip outside of America was to Barbados, and he made the trip with Lawrence. While they were there, George suffered from smallpox and his illness left him with permanent facial scars. 
When Lawrence, who was suffering from tuberculosis, died in 1752, George inherited Lawrence's estate, Mount Vernon, in Alexandria, Virginia. George had been a surveyor before this and was saving up money to purchase his own land but after inheriting his brother's estate, his brother's final gift to him, he no longer had to worry about buying and building his own. 
The same year Lawrence died, in 1752, the twenty-year-old George was appointed as the commander of the Virginia militia. He had no military experience prior to this. As part of the Virginia militia, he fought in the French and Indian War. His actions during the war put him in charge of every militia force in Virginia. In 1759, he resigned and returned home. At just 27 years old, he was elected into the Virginia House of Burgesses and served until 1774. That same year, in 1759, he married a wealthy widow named Martha Dandridge Custiss. They never had any children, but she had two children from her first marriage, and George was a doting stepfather to the two of them
In the 1760s, the years leading up to the American Revolution, George Washington at the time was just an average citizen, enjoying his family and household, but he became fed up with the rising taxes. He had expanded his Mount Vernon estate into an 8,000 acre property that contained five farms and he raised mules and grew a variety of crops. The taxes were starting to take a toll on him, and many other Americans, financially. He joined the countless other colonists who decided to stand up against England. 
In 1774, George served in the First Continental Congress and a year later, was named the Continental Army's commander-in-chief. After the war's official end in 1783, George was hailed as a national hero, but, being the humble man that he was, he remained graciously modest. He returned home to Mount Vernon and resumed his life as an average farmer, but in 1787, was summoned to attend the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia to help draft a new Constitution. While he was there, the other delegates once again recognized him for his impressive leadership during the revolution, and how he had managed to influence those under his command to continue fighting and not give up. They all came to the agreement that George Washington should be the nation's first president.
George Washington's gentle, humble nature came back at first, but the demand of the public made him give in. On January 7th, the first presidential election was held and he won against John Adams, the other presidential nominee. John Adams became the vice-president. 
He was inaugurated in New York City and was the only president to have never lived in the White House, as Washington D.C. was not yet the nation's capitol. During his time as president, George Washington lived in both New York City and Philadelphia. He decided to set examples of what he felt a president needed to be. He kept things fair and equal as possible. He built cordial relationships with other countries and wanted to remain neutral in foreign conflicts. The public, still used to the ways of England, wanted to appoint him as a king, but the nation's first president gently reminded them what they had fought for; not a monarchy, but a republic, a government run by the people and for the people. He refused to serve any more terms than two.   
In 1796, he read a farewell address to his nation and encouraged future presidents to keep the standards he set. He then retired to Mount Vernon and lived the last three years of his life being the gentleman farmer he wanted to be before his forty years of public service. 
He died at the age of 67 in 1799 from a throat infection, but his legacy lives on as The Father of our Country, and named in his honor is our nation's capitol, among countless schools, towns, counties, and even an entire U.S. state. 
In 1800, the very first unofficial "Washington's Birthday" was celebrated on the day of his birth by a country still mourning him one a year after his death, and in 1879, it became an official commemoration day, celebrated only in Washington D.C. In 1885, the first Washington's Birthday was declared a national holiday. In 1971, the holiday became known as President's Day and was moved to the third Monday of February as an attempt to create more three day weekends for workers,  and the holiday celebrating Washington was then shared with Abraham Lincoln. Many still recognize February 22 as being Washington's Birthday and museums and historical societies often hold Washington-related events to honor him.'
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